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American Diabetes Month 2015 - Day 2: Biomedical Clock

Day 2.  Alright, got through one day this month so far.  The craziness of Daylight Savings time doesn't just extend to the fact that I have electronics that do not automatically update the time, like my microwave, oven, insulin pump, and glucometer; but the fact that when you shift things by an hour for good, there are some biochemical changes that I have the pleasure of dealing with.

My insulin pump has settings of basal rates that change from hour-to-hour.  These settings may change on the half-hour (x:00 and x:30 where x is the hour).  This means that the change of 1 hour if not observed properly can cause some issues to the balance that my body normally gets.  Whenever I travel to a different time zone for a short period of time, I do not change my insulin pump clock, because even though it may be "incorrect" my body shouldn't get used to the change in time zone as I tend to keep about the same schedule.  Also, I have found out that with my insulin pump now also being my CGM machine, it would cause some issues when I upload data, which is not something I want to be dealing with when I'm away from home.

In the long run, it takes a few days for my body to get acclimated to the new shift in time, mostly because of the the numerous changes I have in my basal rates throughout the day.  It's a pretty easy switch-over once it's done, but it's one that I'm happy I only have to make twice a year.

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